From onsite employee to remote employee: lessons learned?

amazzocchi's profile thumbnail
Working as a remote and onsite employee, I’d be interested in hearing about how people transition. Both roles and work environments/communities are very different.
sandramedina's profile thumbnail
Also wondering about this because I'm considering transitioning into a hybrid or full time remote role
CPeer's profile thumbnail
Hi! 1. Looking back, what do you wish you had known during the conversations / negotiations with your company (or boss)? --> I was really nervous about asking to transition to 100% remote. I shouldn't have been. My boss thought I was quitting and when she figured out I just wanted to work 100% remote, she was relieved. (This was in 2006 and I've worked remotely ever since.)2. If anything, what would you have done differently, hindsight 20/20? --> Worried less.3. Did you take a pay cut? If so, how did you react and/or how was that negotiated or discussed? Are you satisfied with the outcome? No - no pay cut.4. What are some good (or tough) lessons that you've learned about yourself and your team/s since you've transitioned from onsite to remote? I love using our AI Assistant named "Alfred" who chats with us, predicts which activities are most important to us (things like mentoring, professional development, lunch discussions around specific topics, etc.) and offers to kick off those activities. That makes it SO much easier to connect with each other remotely.
Thanks for sharing @CPeer. When you went remote and didn't take a pay cut, did you relocate to a region with a different cost of living? Or did you stay in the same region? There are articles I've seen that seem to go either way, in that converting to remote and relocating didn't impact pay, while others' pay was adjusted for their relocation's regional COL (i.e., typically taking a cut).
CPeer's profile thumbnail
I did move to a region with a different cost of living, but it wasn't outside of the state and that is how our geographic differentials were set up. It all depends on how a company has their geographic differentials set up, and how granular they are. I've had employees who worked for me who have moved and we never lowered someone's salary - ever - but they could get "red boxed" which would make it difficult or impossible to get a raise without taking on a role with more responsibility. Hopefully that makes sense.
Pei's profile thumbnail
I've transitioned to remote at current company for more than a year now. Here are my takes:1. Looking back, what do you wish you had known during the conversations / negotiations with your company (or boss)?I wish I could outline my duties and working hours more clearly. Since my boss flies all over the world, and me doing remote somewhat makes him feel that I'm on call 24 hours.2. If anything, what would you have done differently, hindsight 20/20?I would set a concrete KPI and a regular meeting hour with my boss.3. Did you take a pay cut? If so, how did you react and/or how was that negotiated or discussed? Are you satisfied with the outcome?I did. But I was reallocated back home from a foreign country. So a pay cut was acceptable.4. What are some good (or tough) lessons that you've learned about yourself and your team/s since you've transitioned from onsite to remote?I've learned that if the team or the management is not ready for remote, then members might potentially drift apart. Ever since I become remote, I am less involved in the core business of the company. However, I do not regret the decision, because remote work has brought me so much more than current job. But if you are eager to be a key role of the company, you certainly need a systematic management to stay relevant.
lauramarks's profile thumbnail
I was at a fully distributed company for 2 years, and now I'm working remotely at my startup. We're 4 people and I'm the only person that's remote and the first time anyone on the team has ever worked with a remote employee. So it's certainly interesting!1. Looking back, what do you wish you had known during the conversations / negotiations with your company (or boss)?-- Instead of just looking for the "okay you can be remote," I wish I had also asked questions into how willing they were to support me while being remote (i.e. committing to 1:1 calls, openness to using new tools so we can continuously communicate, setting a clear date for determining KPIs, agreeing on what "success" looks like, etc.)2. If anything, what would you have done differently, hindsight 20/20?--see question 1. 3. Did you take a pay cut? If so, how did you react and/or how was that negotiated or discussed? Are you satisfied with the outcome?--No pay cut4. What are some good (or tough) lessons that you've learned about yourself and your team/s since you've transitioned from onsite to remote?--In my previous role, I spent a lot of time being guilty that I got to be remote. Because of that, I worked way too many hours and never formally took vacation or days off (unless I was super ill). What I've realized is that being remote is a benefit; I need to look at it as part of my pay. I can't waste time/energy feeling guilty for getting to be remote. I don't feel guilty when I'm given health insurance, so being remote is no different. Feeling like I have to walk on eggshells because I'm remote doesn't serve anyone -- not my boss and certainly not me.
KendraRamick's profile thumbnail
This was back in 2005, so remote work was still relatively new to me.1. Looking back, what do you wish you had known during the conversations / negotiations with your company (or boss)?--I wish I had negotiated quarterly or monthly travel back to the corporate office. Just to check in with the team, build relationships, and do some networking.2. If anything, what would you have done differently, hindsight 20/20?--My entire team was remote, and our manager was not great at helping us form a cohesive working group. I wish I had been able to encourage more interaction between the team via chat/video calls.3. Did you take a pay cut? If so, how did you react and/or how was that negotiated or discussed? Are you satisfied with the outcome?--No pay cut.4. What are some good (or tough) lessons that you've learned about yourself and your team/s since you've transitioned from onsite to remote?--I learned that I can definitely get more done when I work remotely, but that I also tend to get stuck in my routine and habits. To encourage creativity in problem solving, and to stay motivated, I need a good balance between being in the office with a team, and working remotely.
@KendraRamick Thanks for your reply. Did you move to an area that was a different cost of living when you didn't take a pay cut? If it was a lower cost of living, how did you manage to not take a pay cut?