I quit my job in search for a more meaningful life, now what?

OctaviaRomano's profile thumbnail
Hi! I think following what you really want to do (even if you are not sure what that is yet) is the best way to live. Sometimes that's not possible, if you have children for example, or you if don't have the financial means. I think that you are way more than prepared! I've moved countries with almost no money in the bank and no job before moving, everything worked out. Sometimes it was stressful, but if you listen to yourself and are confident in your abilities, you'll find your way. You also have many skills, you could freelance or work part time if you want to avoid some stress related to uncertainty or financial insecurity. In terms of becoming a tech consultant, you could use the time after quitting to research about it, network, etc. And again, I think freelancing or even finding a part time job could help with that journey.I'd be happy to chat more if you want to! You can DM here or on LinkedIn
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @OctaviaRomano, thanks for your words! I guess the most challenging for me at the moment is to find work as a freelancer. I see so many talented people on those freelancing platforms and just feel I have no way in getting any work because I don't have that much experience or at least portfolio.
OctaviaRomano's profile thumbnail
I understand. I’m messaging you over LinkedIn!
MinaFung's profile thumbnail
Soraia, first I love your courage. People who get too comfortable in the corporate world want to change but 80% or even 90% of them don't take any action. I was one of those people for years. Now I even have a podcast to encourage people to think about change.I've been building my consultancy business, startups etc since I walked out from my high paying job 7 years ago. Many lessons learned later, here's what I'd share with others who want to explore:1. Everyone else experience is different. Build your own paths. One is to take the time to explore and allow yourself time to rediscover things. Another is to plan and focus on what you want to achieve.2. Option 1: Both time and money run out quickly. While it's a more enjoyable way to do it, it has its risk. So as @OctaviaRomano suggested, taking a part-time job may help you reduce financial stress. If you can significantly reduce your spending, that would help.3. Option 2: A much more disciplined approach if you want to build a consulting business. Focus on customer development and get a few customers first before you build out anything fancy. 4. Keep building your own side business while discovering the intersection you can be the best at and go find the work/business you'd enjoy doing in the next 10 years.
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @MinaFung , thanks for your reply. I totally agree, I'm planning on getting something part time after three months if "nothing comes in". I guess I"m now excited with this free time I'll have to explore and discover new things :)
cindychendev's profile thumbnail
Hi Soraia! I quit my job in August and we moved across the country (I'm in the US). I wasn't getting that fulfillment and was feeling burned out. It was scary for me, as I was leaving a "safe" job in healthcare. It's also the first time I've pretty much been unemployed since I started at the age of 13. I decided to take a leap of faith and invest in myself by pursuing a coding bootcamp. I recently finished the bootcamp about a month ago and am trying to navigate this unfamiliar territory. It's all pretty scary but I'm just trying to take it one day at a time. Feel free to reach out if you want to chat more!
nhalabi's profile thumbnail
Hi @Soraia! I am going through the exact same thing actually! I'm 28 and just quit my job this past January just because of how unhappy and unbalanced I felt-- It was a scary decision, but ultimately I felt I had to take the jump and follow that "inner voice" as you mentioned. What have been doing have been trying to seek webinars/seminars for the industry I am looking to enter to see what is available and what catches my interest. I've also been playing the LinkedIn game and trying to reach out to those in the industry I'm looking for. Additionally, I was pretty lucky that my alma mater offered career development programs for their alumni so that's been very helpful for me. I'd recommend maybe seeing what your college/university has for their alumni!But also, don't forget to have fun and enjoy hobbies you haven't had a chance to pursue. Burn out is such a real thing people experience and I hope you find enjoyment in the quit while you have it! I'm happy to connect with you further and chat about anything-- if you need support or an ear to brainstorm ideas of paths forward, I'd be happy to help!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @nhalabi thank you so much for your comment and happy to know you've also decided that enough is enough. How is it going so far?Thanks for your tips, definitely will take advantage of so many talks and conferences that have been happening online now.Also wasn't aware of those career development courses from universities, but just checked mine and they don't seem to offer :/ but there are several out there for free as well :)Just connected on Linkedin!
nhalabi's profile thumbnail
@Soraia, happy to connect with you!It's going ok for me so far! Thank you for asking. I've been trying my best to balance "productive" work (i.e job applicants, networking, webinars) with leisure. To be honest, at times it feels very discouraging and hopeless, but overall I'm definitely taking things a day at a time and continuing to explore my options-- thankfully I've saved up enough where I'm not too rushed to jump to the next opportunity-- haha.
JenWalterCoaching's profile thumbnail
Congratulations, @Soraia! It so exciting to see women go after what they really want.I know what you mean about that voice inside of us! Last year I left my 25-year corporate career to start my coaching business. I love it! There's no way I'm going back.Looks like you've done some good planning and have some great skills. Now you just need to figure out what lights you up! And if you start down one path and it doesn't feel right, you can always change course.You've already taken the first step, which is often the hardest.
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Thank you @JenWalterCoaching! It's encouraging to hear from other women who have felt and done something similar and they're loving it!
andyhappy1's profile thumbnail
Hey. I did this about 6 years ago. The money I budgeted was spent at double to triple the rate I had initially planned.You’ve got software dev skills, so when you hit less than 90 days of money you should start looking for a quick gig. my overall advise is simply get your vintage clothing business profitable ASAP. That’ll be enough of a goal...no need to make anything complicated.Since you have six months of money, go full on into making your side business profitable for 3 months, then reassess.First casualty of war is the battle plan...so expect everything to fall apart after two weeks...and just trust yourself to make the right choice for you. You have more information about your situation than anyone else, so you’re the expert.
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @andyhappy1, thanks so much for your advice. I'll be following it and doing exactly what you said: focus on my side business for 3months and then reassess. Perfect!
kathylam's profile thumbnail
@Soraia, I'd like to commend you for taking the move. Here are a few options you can consider.. Take a look at people who inspire you, and reach out to them to see how they got there. There's tons of fantastic people here that would be open to those conversations with you. find your ikigai (google this and find a worksheet). Look for a mission that resonates with you. Finally, you can talk to a career coach. I know someone who has been extremely instrumental in helping me determine the next steps. happy to connect you.
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi and thanks @kathylam, that just turned out to be my Sunday afternoon: reflect about my ikigai.There's several missions I'd like to explore, would be great to somehow connect all of them and make them work for each other.Thanks, happy to have the name for future reference :)
Congrats on going after what you want!! I completely relate to the feeling that evenings and weekends isn’t enough to time to get things done / socialise / rest / live the way you want to!Have you heard of FIRE? (Financial independence, retire early). It’s basically an investment strategy / financial plan where the goal is to save enough that you can live off the interest earned on your savings/investments. Not sure if this is totally the path you’re looking for but it’s worth thinking about how investing your money can impact your life. There is a lot you can do if you’re able to save regularly - especially if you’re able to save heavily or early which it sounds like you already are! This kind of path can give you the financial freedom to quit the rat race early or scale down your work - maybe contracting half the year and living on your own terms the rest of it. In any case contracting may be a path well suited to you so you can have periods of work and periods of whatever you want :)Good luck it’s a very exciting leap you’re taking!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi Rosana and thanks for the support! Never heard of FIRE, and at the moment, even though I have some investments, they're not high enough to have a monthly interest that can pay the bills. I think that's an interesting approach though, I hope it will be possible when I'm closer to my 40s.Regarding the work 6m and "chill" the other 6m is an idea I've had a few times, maybe that's a reasonable balance I'll try to have.Thank you :)
MWags's profile thumbnail
First of all CONGRATULATIONS! This is a huge step, and you are massively courageous for taking it.As a career and lifestyle coach, I know there are KINDS of great next steps you can take, but my absolute favorite for this "where next?" mood is the 'Ideal Day' exercise. I'm attaching a screenshot of it, but I'm also happy to send a .pdf along (to anyone who's interested, just DM me). The idea is to imagine yourself in an ideal state -- in this case a work day that provides you with a sense of contribution as well as accomplishment -- and visualize what that might look like. There are also all kinds of ways to more deeply explore and define your "purpose" (which is an ever-evolving thing, not just a singular, static state!) but the ideal day is a really fantastic starting point!Good luck and if you decide to try the exercise, I'd love to know how it goes!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @MWags, this is great! I've been reading some self development books and listening to some podcasts and they always say how powerful visualisation is and actually believe what you foresee for yourself.This was the second year I did a vision board for my year and last year was pretty great in terms of achieving some goals.I'd be very keen to have your PDF and I'll add this task to my todo list from take aways of this post.Thank you!
leenab's profile thumbnail
First of all, this is great! For your age you have done a fantastic job with your financial life. So congrats!I'm not fully sure what you mean by technical consultant exactly. Would you mind elaborating? In general, the first order of business would be to start writing content on LinkedIn and forums where techies visit. Beyond that my recommendation would be to start speaking at relevant conferences which is where you can meet CEOs and other folks in positions of authority. The goal is to do this simultaneously while you're doing the legalities and initial work of establishing your consulting business. Overall, regardless of which route you go, one of my strong recommendations is generating passive income so you can always choose projects you work as your interests evolve and change and the income continues to come in (in my experience these are the typical items that would need some upfront or actual work eg. investments but then it builds up on itself with mostly hands-off but occasional "maintenance"). This will always ensure that you keep building wealth.I would recommend that some bit of your wealth goes towards investments; you're really young so the risk from a long term investment strategy is really low. However, frankly, I'm assuming you're already doing it. Beyond that I do like the idea of content photography as you can continue to build a portfolio as long as your interest is in it, and perhaps you can get royalties this way.
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @leenab thank you so much for your feedback. I guess I'm not too sure what I mean by "tech consultant" yet, but possibly guide startups on their tech stack? Help them with resources and possibly cross connect some people from my network to help on those projects?It's going to be one of my areas of focus, to find more about coaching and consulting as they're both interests I'd like to develop a bit more.Ahah, you're right, I started investing 3y ago but the returns are far from enough to pay the bills. Still I'm happy for the predicted profit for when I retire.That's such a good idea, do you have experience with that? (getting royalties from photography/other means?)Thanks! :)
leenab's profile thumbnail
I can share at a general level - writing a book or submitting content; these may be slow in getting you significant royalties right away. This is where the "upfront" work comes in and these will be definitely a side hustle in the beginning, not necessarily a significant income generating option right away. Of course, if you snag a great deal with a big publisher (for a book) then of course, it's a different ball game.Good luck!
mayalingam's profile thumbnail
Hi @Soraia, I'm a (non-technical) founder of an early stage startup in the sustainability space and have been looking for some technical guidance as we continue building and iterating. Have DM'd you with some more details, perhaps there's a way to work together if it's of any interest! Also, congrats on the new direction! :)
SandraYLewis's profile thumbnail
Soraia, I'm moved by your courage and connection to your inner voice. You have lots of talents and interests that seem to light your heart. Perhaps some of them can help you generate a few more months of income until you make your next move. You mentioned staying aligned with your purpose. This is a powerful strategy. Though you have a wide range of abilities, purpose is a thread that connects them. If you haven't done so already, I'd encourage you to come up with a sentence that reflects your purpose. It will help you stay grounded and make clear decisions as you embark on this next chapter. For example, if you're here to inspire others or help others ignite their creative power, you can use this like a compass to guide you in work and personal development decisions.I wish you all the best.Peace,Sandra
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @SandraYLewis and thanks so much for your advice. I guess that just like in any business you want to start, you always need a mission statement. Why not applying the same for our goals and dreams and live by it? Will definitely do that :)
SandraYLewis's profile thumbnail
Yes @Soraia. A purpose statement is a great foundation for building mission statements. Aligning our business mission with our personal mission gives it a supercharge. I know a someone who sees her purpose as helping people expand their vision of what's possible. As a stylist, she helps people explore a range of ways to present their brand. She also engages in some community work with youth where she helps them explore ways of nurturing their bodies and minds. I think of purpose as infinite. It will help you stand out no matter what you're doing. You can probably see some common threads across your talents and interest. Good luck with your statement.
marisolcamacho's profile thumbnail
Hi @Soraia! I quit my start-up 9am-9pm role in August of 2019! I moved back home (since that was an option for me) and did the things I really wanted to be doing/try. I enrolled in Yoga Teacher Training, started working part-time at Lululemon, teaching yoga, and doing a lot of inner work to help me get clear on what I really want to do in this lifetime. I started working for a small business, then COVID happened, and in the summer of 2020 - I was laid off! This was actually great and the universe pushing me - since it basically gave me the time and space to explore what I really wanted - yet AGAIN lol. During that time I realized I really wanted to help people, but I didn't want to be a therapist, so I was kinda lost - then I discovered - I can help people by being a coach/mentor, so I enrolled in a really amazing coach training program (and I am set to be certified this summer). I also started working for a really great company in August of 2020 that I plan to stay at until I scale my coaching business to match close to my salary. I had/have lots of ideas but coaching people and helping them find their answers (since plot twist true coaching is not giving advice), is what really energizes me and where I see my skills and personality make the most impact - so I have truly focused on that and have had some great wins so far :) I coach on Mindset and Career Clarity - since really it's ALOT of Mindset work to get clear on what you want / who you are / what that looks like in a career or what that looks like as an entrepreneur. My biggest piece of advice is the corporate job will always be there - if you need it. Just because you quit once doesn't mean you can't go back, part-time work also helps keep you afloat and give you time in your day to work on what's important to you! The second piece of advice, you have a lot of amazing skills that you could easily make a profitable business with - of all of those ideas, what are you most passionate about? What energizes you? Give your all to that one idea (plant the seed, nurture it, water it, and it will grow)! The third piece of advice - create a vision board! What does your dream life look like? What actions do you need to take to get there?Enjoy your time of discovery, excited to see what you will do! :)
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @marisolcamacho, thanks so much for sharing your story and giving your advice!Happy you also didn't give up on your vision and dream and everything is going well.Totally agree, I keep thinking that worst case scenario I just go for another bunch of interviews and go back to work on a company, I'd have no problems in doing so and retry again a few years later.Guess that's my next task, in reflecting on all of my ideas and combine with my skills and see what excites me the most. I have done vision boards for the past two years and I really like the power of visualisation! Thanks a lot for your support! :)
Hi @marisolcamachoho, thank you for sharing your story. It's great to hear found your path, especially when I'm trying to figure out mine! I'd love to connect with you on LinkedIn and hear more about your journey.
PattiChan's profile thumbnail
@Soraia, CONGRATS on making the tough decision to leave your job - sounds like you followed your heart, which has yet to let you down. I felt the same nervous energy when I left my 10 year career in tech consulting (which I'm also happy to talk about) in 2014. I wrote about my experience taking time off, figuring out my life's purpose, and what I did with my time here: https://www.pattichan.com/career-lost-and-found-why-dont-you-take-time-off-2. I've had three amazingly fulfilling jobs since then, each one more rewarding than the last - both financially and spiritually. I'm currently enjoying another mini work sabbatical, one where I've been lucky enough to have people approach me for advising and coaching (which I've agreed to informally). Everything I have today comes from taking the time to listen to myself six years ago. Excited for you and your journey, happy to chat more if helpful!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Thanks @PattiChan :) I just read your 3part article and it helped clear out some questions I have at the moment.Just sent you a request on LinkedIn 👍
ashwinnie's profile thumbnail
Hi @PattiChan, thanks for sharing your article. I found it really useful - especially as I am grappling with burnout in my current role. I just sent you a request on linkedin, I'd love to chat some more about your experience cofounding a startup after your first job. It's definitely a path I am considering at the moment.
rachelclifton's profile thumbnail
Thank you so much for this, @PattiChan! Am in a similar boat and would love to chat further - have reached out on LI. Appreciate your candour and generosity with your time, energy and heart.
TCBotten's profile thumbnail
My husband and I both quit our jobs and moved our family to Italy for a year in 2019 so I could eat my MBA through the University of Iowa’s CIMBA program abroad. It was scary. It took guts. We too saved a bunch of money, rented our house out and made the move with kids in Elementary school. People said often, “oh so could never do that.” They planted their own seeds of doubt in us but we didn’t water it to let it grow. We had a plan and stuck to it. After we came back we wondered why we hadn’t don’t it earlier. I get paid way better than pre-MBA. My kids now understand and speak Italian better than their parents. We had incredible experiences.Even when I graduated I was motivated but not desperate to find a job. It took me six months because I asked the right questions, networked with the right people and found a role that I love. I now work in health care which I love because millions of people benefit from a product I work on. If it wasn’t a fit I was honest and moved on. Sometimes my husband thought I was nuts to walk away from some offers but it was worth it in the end. Keep your North Star bright and head towards it and you will get where you want to be. Best of luck!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @TCBotten and thank you for sharing your story. That's definitely a brave move and I'm so happy it all worked out. The victory feels even better when other people doubt us right?Thanks for the support and all the best with your projects too :)
rachelclifton's profile thumbnail
Love this! Thank you so much for sharing. In a similar boat to Soraia and have just reached out to connect on LI. So happy to hear how things have worked out for you :)
ImanOmari20's profile thumbnail
I was in the same place a few years ago. I felt trapped and unfulfilled and I was obsessing over a business idea for years before I jumped right in. For me, my biggest motivation was having freedom of when and where I could work . Also having the option of working on a project I am passionate about. (Although I haven't continued with my project, I learned a lot about myself and what it means to work on your own startup as a new entrepreneur)It seems you are very skilled and talented, so there are so many exciting projects/ideas you could embark on ! One thing that comes to my mind is to be sure to allocate a good portion of time for you to research and find that one project/business idea or passion you will pursue. This takes some time which people sometimes tend to underestimate. Focus is very important and is something that I struggled with as I was thinking of doing so many things at the same time. Happy to connect on LinkedIn if you would like to chat
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @ImanOmari20 and thanks! Like they say "you either win or you learn", so there's nothing to lose in trying to pursue our goals.I'm glad you followed your voice, learned and enjoyed while you worked on your projects.I already have the business idea I'd like to develop more (I've started prototyping), just hoping I can stay focused and apply for funding! Just connected via LinkedIn :)
ImanOmari20's profile thumbnail
Yes that is very true. Awesome news about your prototype. My biggest struggle when I worked on my startup was with development as I had to outsource it to an offshore company . Good luck on your next steps .
Vika's profile thumbnail
Congratulations, Soraia! I’ve had that “enough is enough” moment last summer and quit my job in September. Had savings planned to explore new projects and ideas without worrying much. My exploration led me to start organizing the virtual community and event for remote professionals and entrepreneurs who are looking to network and find the support system in the new normal. But I’ve been just resting, traveling, and recharging for the first 3 months :)
EllenD's profile thumbnail
Hi SoraiaCongrats on listening to your intuition and creating this level of clarity so far! Rooting for you :)I too quit a career that was unfulfilling and knew wasn't for me long term. That was 18 months ago and since then Ive made over six figures in revenue self-employed and set up a programme to help others to do the same (turn their passion and skills into a viable business). I'm in London too, so if you want to chat, drop me a DM or book a free call via my website if you're keen to learn more. www.the-ask.uk
rachelclifton's profile thumbnail
Hey Ellen - not OP (clearly!) but would love to chat further. I'm in a very similar boat & currently also London-based! Would you be open to me sliding into your DMs? Post here about my own experience & journey: https://elpha.com/posts/7ukgv5hj/calling-all-adventurers-mavericks-trailblazers-and-magic-makers-i-want-to-hear-your-stories
rachelserwetz's profile thumbnail
Thank you for sharing your story! For those in a similar position to @Soraia : Hi! I'm Rachel Serwetz, an ICF-certified career coach. My background is at Goldman Sachs & Bridgewater Associates, before moving into the career space to systematize my novel career exploration and job search methods and tools.My mission in life is to ensure people feel supported in making these critical, impactful career decisions. These decisions can feel stressful and tough, but with the right support (which you deserve), you can feel relieved, excited and confident in your next steps. I have been coaching hundreds of professionals for over 8 years and have developed unique processes and frameworks so that you can confidently clarify your ideal career direction and efficiently job search to land a role you feel fulfilled by. Happy to chat directly and see how I can help! calendly.com/woken/demo Best,Racheliamwoken.com
anemari's profile thumbnail
Hi Soraia!Your story resonates so much with me :)I quit my full time as a Tech Lead a year ago for more or less the same reasons as you with no plan for what to do next.It was not easy. The first month I was having second thoughts every day about my decision but with time this got easier. Having a new goal helped :)I am currently running my own business as a career coach in tech making use of my technical, coaching and leadership skills acquired over the years to support other to get into tech.Now.. how do you start on this new path? Small steps :)I would be happy to have a chat and share with you some tips on how to get started :)Let me know!
Soraia's profile thumbnail
Hi @anemari, I would love to! Now that I'm two months in as self employed and feeling a bit lost!Thank you 😊
anemari's profile thumbnail
sending you a message ;)
anitadhir's profile thumbnail
You are so talented. So good to see that you took the courage to follow your heart. It is so incredibly liberating. I did the same after 9/11. In 2002, I started my business providing consulting and training services in project management. Later, I self-published books on PMP certification. I teach at NYU as well.It is lovely to work on projects that involve collaboration and make a positive difference. Happy to see that you have focused on financial security as well. I would stress that for me: following my 33% rule (living on 33% of my gross during my corporate years) helped me create a great cushion. Furthermore, I have found that being frugal has benefited me both personally and professionally.When I'm looking for cost-effective and lean solutions for my clients, it's helped me be more creative.